2015
Briquettes
A briquette (or briquet) is a compressed block of coal dust or other combustible biomass material such as charcoal, sawdust, wood chips,  peat, or paper used for fuel and kindling to start a fire. The term comes from the French language and is related to brick.
Constituents of charcoal briquettes
Charcoal briquettes sold for cooking food can include:[3][4]
·         Wood charcoal (fuel)
·         Lignite coal (fuel)
·         Anthracite coal (fuel)
·         Limestone (ash colourant)
·         Starch (binder)
·         Borax (release agent)
·         Sodium nitrate (accelerant)
·         Sawdust
·         Wax (some brands: binder, accelerant, ignition facilitator).
·         Chaff (rice chaff and peanut chaff)
Some briquettes are compressed and dried brown coal extruded into hard blocks. This is a common technique for low rank coals. They are typically dried to 12-18% moisture, and are primarily used in household and industry.
Peat briquettes
In Ireland, peat briquettes are a common type of solid fuel, largely replacing sods of raw peat as a domestic fuel. These briquettes consist of shredded peat, compressed to form a virtually smokeless, slow-burning, easily stored and transported fuel. Although often used as the sole fuel for a fire, they are also used to quickly and easily light a coal fire.
Biomass briquettes
Biomass briquettes are made from agricultural waste and are a replacement for fossil fuels such as oil or coal, and can be used to heat boilers in manufacturing plants, and also have applications in developing countries. Biomass briquettes are a renewable source of energy and avoid adding fossil carbon to the atmosphere.
A number of companies in India have switched from furnace oil to biomass briquettes to save costs on boiler fuels. The use of biomass briquettes is predominant in the southern parts of India, where coal and furnace oil are being replaced by biomass briquettes. A number of units in Maharashtra (India) are also using biomass briquettes as boiler fuel. Use of biomass briquettes can earn Carbon Credits for reducing emissions in the atmosphere. Lanxess India and a few other large companies are supposedly using biomass briquettes for earning Carbon Credits by switching their boiler fuel. Biomass briquettes also provide more calorific value/kg and save around 30-40 percent of boiler fuel costs.
A popular biomass briquette emerging in developed countries takes a waste produce such as sawdust, compresses it and then extrudes it to make a reconsistuted log that can replace firewood. It is a similar process to forming a wood pellet but on a larger scale. There are no binders involved in this process. The natural lignin in the wood binds the particles of wood together to form a solid. Burning a wood briquette is far more efficient than burning firewood. Moisture content of a briquette can be as low as 4%, whereas green firewood may be as high as 65%.
The extrusion production technology of briquettes is the process of extrusion screw wastes (straw, sunflower husks, buckwheat, etc.) or finely shredded wood waste (sawdust) under high pressure when heated from 160 to 350 C °. As shown in the table above the quality of such briquets, especially heat content, is much higher comparing with other methods like using piston presses.

Sawdust briquettes have developed over time with two distinct types: those with holes through the centre, and those that are solid. Both types are classified as briquettes but are formed using different techniques. A solid briquette is manufactured using a piston press that compresses sandwiched layers of sawdust together. Briquettes with a hole are produced with a screw press. The hole is from the screw thread passing through the centre, but it also increases the surface area of the log and aids efficient combustion.
Use in China
Throughout China, cylindrical briquettes, called "fēng wō méi" (beehive coal 蜂窩煤 / 窝煤) or "Mei" (coal ) or "liàn tàn" (kneaded coal 練炭 / 练炭), are used in purpose-built cookers. The origin of "Mei" is "Rentan" (kneaded coal 練炭) of Japan. Rentan was invented in Japan in the 19th century, and spread to Manchukuo, Korea and China in the first half of the 20th century. There were many Rentan factories in Manchukuo and Pyongyang. Although Rentan went out of use in Japan after the 1970s, it is still popular in China, Korea ("yeon tan" kneaded coal 연탄) and Vietnam ("than" coal).
The cookers are simple, ceramic vessels with metal exteriors. Two types are made: the single, or triple briquette type, the latter holding the briquettes together side by side. These cookers can accommodate a double stack of cylinders. A small fire of tinder is started, upon which the cylinder(s) is placed. When a cylinder is spent, another cylinder is placed on top using special tongs, with the one below igniting it. The fire can be maintained by swapping spent cylinders for fresh ones, and retaining a still-glowing spent cylinder.
Each cylinder lasts for over an hour. These cookers are used to cook, or simmer, pots of tea, eggs, soups, stews, etc. The cylinders are delivered, usually by cart, to businesses, and are very inexpensive.
Paper briquettes
Paper briquettes are the byproduct of a briquettor, which compresses shredded paper material into a small cylindrical form. Briquettors are often sold as add-on systems to existing disintegrator or rotary knife mill shredding systems. The NSA has a maximum particle size regulation for shredded paper material that is passed through a disintegrator or rotary knife mill, which typically does not exceed 1/8” square.[5] This means that material exiting a disintegrator is the appropriate size for compression into paper briquettes, as opposed to strip-cut shredders which produce long sheets of paper.
After being processed through the disintegrator, paper particles are typically passed through an air system to remove dust and unwanted magnetic materials before being sent into the briquettor. The air system may also be responsible for regulating moisture content in the waste particles, as briquetting works optimally within a certain range of moisture. Studies have shown that the optimal moisture percentage for shredded particles is 18% for paper and 22% for wheat straw.[6]
Environmental Impact
Briquetted paper has many notable benefits, many of which minimize the impact of the paper waste generated by a shredding system. Several manufactures claim up to 90% volume reduction of briquetted paper waste versus traditional shredding. Decreasing the volume of shredded waste allows it to be transported and stored more efficiently, reducing the cost and fuel required in the disposal process.
In addition to the cost savings associated with reducing the volume of waste, paper briquettes are more useful in paper mills to create recycled paper than uncompressed shredded material. Compressed briquettes can also be used as a fuel for starting fires or as an insulating material.
Charcoal
Charcoal is a light, black residue, consisting of carbon and any remaining ash, obtained by removing water and other volatile constituents from animal and vegetation substances. Charcoal is usually produced by slow pyrolysis, the heating of wood or other substances in the absence of oxygen (see char and biochar). It is usually an impure form of carbon as it contains ash; however, sugar charcoal is among the purest forms of carbon readily available, particularly if it is not made by heating but by a dehydration reaction with sulfuric acid to minimise the introduction of new impurities, as impurities can be removed from the sugar in advance. The resulting soft, brittle, lightweight, black, porous material resembles coal
History
Historically, production of wood charcoal in locations where there is an abundance of wood dates back to a very ancient period, and generally consists of piling billets of wood on their ends so as to form a conical pile, openings being left at the bottom to admit air, with a central shaft to serve as a flue. The whole pile is covered with turf or moistened clay. The firing is begun at the bottom of the flue, and gradually spreads outwards and upwards. The success of the operation depends upon the rate of the combustion. Under average conditions, 100 parts of wood yield about 60 parts by volume, or 25 parts by weight, of charcoal; small-scale production on the spot often yields only about 50%, large-scale was efficient to about 90% even by the seventeenth century. The operation is so delicate that it was generally left to colliers (professional charcoal burners). They often lived alone in small huts in order to tend their wood piles. For example, in the Harz Mountains of Germany, charcoal burners lived in conical huts called Köten which are still much in evidence today[when?].
The massive production of charcoal (at its height employing hundreds of thousands, mainly in Alpine and neighbouring forests) was a major cause of deforestation, especially in Central Europe. In England, many woods were managed as coppices, which were cut and regrew cyclically, so that a steady supply of charcoal would be available (in principle) forever; complaints (as early as the Stuart period) about shortages may relate to the results of temporary over-exploitation or the impossibility of increasing production to match growing demand. The increasing scarcity of easily harvested wood was a major factor behind the switch to fossil fuel equivalents, mainly coal and brown coal for industrial use.
The use of charcoal as a smelting fuel has been experiencing a resurgence in South America following Brazilian law changes in 2010 to reduce carbon emissions as part of President Lula da Silva's commitment to make a "green steel".[2][3]
The modern process of carbonizing wood, either in small pieces or as sawdust in cast iron retorts, is extensively practiced where wood is scarce, and also for the recovery of valuable byproducts (wood spirit, pyroligneous acid, wood tar), which the process permits. The question of the temperature of the carbonization is important; according to J. Percy, wood becomes brown at 220 °C (428 °F), a deep brown-black after some time at 280 °C (536 °F), and an easily powdered mass at 310 °C (590 °F).[4] Charcoal made at 300 °C (572 °F) is brown, soft and friable, and readily inflames at 380 °C (716 °F); made at higher temperatures it is hard and brittle, and does not fire until heated to about 700 °C (1,292 °F).
In Finland and Scandinavia, the charcoal was considered the by-product of wood tar production. The best tar came from pine, thus pinewoods were cut down for tar pyrolysis. The residual charcoal was widely used as substitute for metallurgical coke in blast furnaces for smelting. Tar production led to rapid deforestation: it has been estimated all Finnish forests are younger than 300 years. The end of tar production at the end of the 19th century resulted in rapid re-forestation.
The charcoal briquette, made commercially using mostly compressed coal dust, was first invented and patented by Ellsworth B. A. Zwoyer of Pennsylvania in 1897[5] and was produced by the Zwoyer Fuel Company. The process was further popularized by Henry Ford, who used wood and sawdust byproducts from automobile fabrication as a feedstock. Ford Charcoal went on to become the Kingsford Company.
Production methods
Charcoal has been made by various methods. The traditional method in Britain used a clamp. This is essentially a pile of wooden logs (e.g. seasoned oak) leaning against a chimney (logs are placed in a circle). The chimney consists of 4 wooden stakes held up by some rope. The logs are completely covered with soil and straw allowing no air to enter. It must be lit by introducing some burning fuel into the chimney; the logs burn very slowly and transform into charcoal in a period of 5 days' burning. If the soil covering gets torn (cracked) by the fire, additional soil is placed on the cracks. Once the burn is complete, the chimney is plugged to prevent air from entering.[6] The true art of this production method is in managing the sufficient generation of heat (by combusting part of the wood material), and its transfer to wood parts in the process of being carbonised. A strong disadvantage of this production method is the huge amount of emissions that are harmful to human health and the environment (emissions of unburnt methane).[7] As a result of the partial combustion of wood material, the efficiency of the traditional method is low.
Improved methods use a sealed metal container, as this does not require watching lest fire break through the covering.[8] However, on-site attendance is required, and also this method sacrifices part of the material for generating process heat - with the associated low yield. At Bulworthy Project in the UK, charcoal production supports an experiment in low-impact living and nature conservation.[9] Modern methods employ retorting technology, in which process heat is recovered from, and solely provided by, the combustion of gas released during carbonisation. (Illustration:[10]). Yields of retorting are considerably higher than those of kilning, and may reach 35%-40%.
Examples of large industrial, but clean, industrial technologies are the Lambiotte shaft furnace, and the Reichert retort.[11] A recently developed technology is the Condensing Retort developed by Clean Fuels.[12] This latter technology is suitable for medium to large industries.
The last section of the film Le Quattro Volte (2010) gives a good and long, if poetic, documentation of the traditional method of making charcoal.[13] The Arthur Ransome children's series Swallows and Amazons (particularly the second book Swallowdale) features carefully drawn vignettes of the lives and the techniques of charcoal burners at the start of the 20th century, in the Lake District of the UK.
The properties of the charcoal produced depend on the material charred. The charring temperature is also important. Charcoal contains varying amounts of hydrogen and oxygen as well as ash and other impurities that, together with the structure, determine the properties. The approximate composition of charcoal for gunpowders is sometimes empirically described as C7H4O. To obtain a coal with high purity, source material should be free of non-volatile compounds (sugar and a high charring temperature can be used). After charring, partial oxidation with oxygen or chlorine can reduce hydrogen levels. For activation of charcoal see activated carbon.
Common charcoal is made from peat, coal, wood, coconut shell, or petroleum. “Activated charcoal” is similar to common charcoal, but is made especially for use as a medicine. To make activated charcoal, manufacturers heat common charcoal in the presence of a gas that causes the charcoal to develop lots of internal spaces or “pores.” These pores help activated charcoal “trap” chemicals.
Types
Commercial charcoal is found in either lump, briquette, or extruded forms:
·         Lump charcoal is made directly from hardwood material and usually produces far less ash than briquettes.
·         Pillow shaped briquettes are made by compressing charcoal, typically made from sawdust and other wood by-products, with a binder and other additives. The binder is usually starch. Some briquettes may also include brown coal (heat source), mineral carbon (heat source), borax, sodium nitrate (ignition aid), limestone (ash-whitening agent), raw sawdust (ignition aid), and other additives.
·         Hexagonal sawdust briquette charcoal are made by compressing sawdust without binders or additives. Hexagonal Sawdust Briquette Charcoal is the preferred charcoal in countries like Taiwan, Korea, Middle East, Greece. It has a round hole through the center, with a hexagonal intersection. Mainly for barbeque uses as it does not emit odor, no smoke, little ash, high heat, and long burning hours (exceeding 4 hours).
·         Extruded charcoal is made by extruding either raw ground wood or carbonized wood into logs without the use of a binder. The heat and pressure of the extruding process hold the charcoal together. If the extrusion is made from raw wood material, the extruded logs are then subsequently carbonized.[14]
·         Japanese charcoal removes pyroligneous acid during the charcoal making. Therefore, when burning, there are almost no stimulating smells or smoke. The charcoal of Japan is classified into three kinds.
1.       White charcoal (Binchōtan) is very hard and has a metallic sound.
2.       Black charcoal
3.       Ogatan is made from hardened sawdust. It is most often used in Izakaya or Yakiniku restaurants.
The characteristics of charcoal products (lump, briquette, or extruded forms) vary widely from product to product. Thus it is a common misconception to stereotype any kind of charcoal, saying which burns hotter or longer etc
Uses
Charcoal has been used since earliest times for a large range of purposes including art and medicine, but by far its most important use has been as a metallurgical fuel. Charcoal is the traditional fuel of a blacksmith's forge and other applications where an intense heat is required. Charcoal was also used historically as a source of carbon black by grinding it up. In this form charcoal was important to early chemists and was a constituent of formulas for mixtures such as black powder. Due to its high surface area charcoal can be used as a filter, and as a catalyst or as an adsorbent
Metallurgical fuel
Charcoal burns at intense temperatures, up to 2,700 °C (4,890 °F).[verification needed] By comparison the melting point of iron is approximately 1,200 to 1,550 °C (2,190 to 2,820 °F). Due to its porosity it is sensitive to the flow of air and the heat generated can be moderated by controlling the air flow to the fire. For this reason charcoal is an ideal fuel for a forge and is still widely used by blacksmiths. Charcoal is also an excellent reducing fuel for the production of iron and has been used that way since Roman times. In the 16th century England had to pass laws to prevent the country from becoming completely denuded of trees due to production of iron. In the 19th century charcoal was largely replaced by coke, baked coal, in steel making due to cost. Charcoal is a far superior fuel to coke,[verification needed] however, because it burns hotter and has no sulfur. Until World War II charcoal was still being used in Sweden to make ultra high-quality steel. In steel-making, charcoal is not only a fuel, but a source for the carbon in the steel according to some scholars such as Moronda, 2011.
After the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15) in Copenhagen, Denmark, the steel industry in Brazil proposed to replace coal and coke with charcoal in their high temperature furnaces. The program "Green Steel for the Brazilian Steel Industry" converted wood from Eucalyptus plantations into charcoal that will be used in steel making.[16]
Industrial fuel
Historically, charcoal was used in great quantities for smelting iron in bloomeries and later blast furnaces and finery forges. This use was replaced by coke in the 19th Century as part of the Industrial Revolution. For this purpose, charcoal in England was measured in dozens (or loads) consisting of 12 sacks or shems or seams, each of 8 bushels.[citation needed] In 2010, Japan Consulting Institute took an action in search of a better, 'greener', and even cheaper alternative to replace fossil fuels like coke in steelmaking. The research revealed that Palm Kernel Shell charcoal (PKS charcoal) is proven to be a better fuel in Electric arc furnace (EAF) as coke replacement.[17] As auxiliary energy in EAF, in many aspects, PKS charcoal outperforms coke
Cooking fuel
Prior to the industrial revolution charcoal was occasionally used as a cooking fuel. Modern "charcoal briquettes" are widely used for outdoor dutch ovens, grilling, and barbecues in backyards and on camping trips, but the briquettes are not pure charcoal.[19] They are usually a compacted mixture of sawdust with additives like coal or coke and various binders.
Syngas production, automotive fuel
Like many other sources of carbon, charcoal can be used for the production of various syngas compositions; i.e., various CO + H2 + CO2 + N2 mixtures. The syngas is typically used as fuel, including automotive propulsion, or as a chemical feedstock.
In times of scarce petroleum, automobiles and even buses have been converted to burn wood gas (a gas mixture consisting primarily of diluting atmospheric nitrogen, but also containing combustible gasses, mostly carbon monoxide) released by burning charcoal or wood in a wood gas generator. In 1931 Tang Zhongming developed an automobile powered by charcoal, and these cars were popular in China until the 1950s. In occupied France during World War II, wood and wood charcoal production for such vehicles (called gazogènes) increased from pre-war figures of approximately fifty thousand tons a year to almost half a million tons in 1943.[20]
Black powder
Charcoal (in the majority of black powder mixtures, together with sulphur) is the fuel component of black powder and blasting powders and is also used in other pyrotechnic mixtures.[21] This charcoal is usually made from specific softwoods (i.e. willow and grapevine) charred at low temperature.[citation needed]
Carbon source
Charcoal may be used as a source of carbon in chemical reactions. One example of this is the production of carbon disulphide through the reaction of sulfur vapors with hot charcoal. In that case the wood should be charred at high temperature to reduce the residual amounts of hydrogen and oxygen that lead to side reactions.
Purification and filtration
Charcoal may be activated to increase its effectiveness as a filter. Activated charcoal readily adsorbs a wide range of organic compounds dissolved or suspended in gases and liquids. In certain industrial processes, such as the purification of sucrose from cane sugar, impurities cause an undesirable color, which can be removed with activated charcoal. It is also used to absorb odors and toxins in gases, such as air. Charcoal filters are also used in some types of gas masks. The medical use of activated charcoal is mainly the absorption of poisons, especially in the case of suicide attempts in which the patient has ingested a large amount of a drug.[22] Activated charcoal is available without a prescription, so it is used for a variety of health-related applications. For example, it is often used to reduce discomfort (and embarrassment) due to excessive gas (commonly known as a fart or flatulence) in the digestive tract.
Animal charcoal or bone black is the carbonaceous residue obtained by the dry distillation of bones. It contains only about 10% carbon, the remainder being calcium and magnesium phosphates (80%) and other inorganic material originally present in the bones. It is generally manufactured from the residues obtained in the glue and gelatin industries. Its decolorizing power was applied in 1812 by Derosne to the clarification of the syrups obtained in sugar refining; but its use in this direction has now greatly diminished, owing to the introduction of more active and easily managed reagents. It is still used to some extent in laboratory practice. The decolorizing power is not permanent, becoming lost after using for some time; it may be revived, however, by washing and reheating. Wood charcoal also to some extent removes coloring material from solutions, but animal charcoal is generally more effective.[citation needed]
Art
Four sticks of vine charcoal and four sticks of compressed charcoal
Two charcoal pencils in paper sheaths that are unwrapped as the pencil is used, and two charcoal pencils in wooden sheaths
·         Main article: Charcoal
·         Charcoal is used in art for drawing, making rough sketches in painting and is one of the possible media for making a parsemage. It must usually be preserved by the application of a fixative. Artists generally utilize charcoal in three forms:
·         Vine charcoal is created by burning sticks of wood (usually willow or linden/Tilia) into soft, medium, and hard consistencies.
Powdered charcoal is often used to "tone" or cover large sections of a drawing surface. Drawing over the toned areas darkens it further, but the artist can also lighten (or completely erase) within the toned area to create lighter tones.
Compressed charcoal charcoal powder mixed with gum binder compressed into round or square sticks. The amount of binder determines the hardness of the stick.[25] Compressed charcoal is used in charcoal pencils.
Horticulture
One additional use of charcoal was rediscovered recently in horticulture. Although American gardeners have been using charcoal for a short while, research on Terra preta soils in the Amazon has found the widespread use of biochar by pre-Columbian natives to turn unproductive soil into carbon rich soil. The technique may find modern application, both to improve soils and as a means of carbon sequestration.
Medicine
Charcoal was consumed in the past as dietary supplement for gastric problems in the form of charcoal biscuits. Now it can be consumed in tablet, capsule or powder form, for digestive effects.[citation needed] Research regarding its effectiveness is controversial.[27] To measure the mucociliary transport time the use was introduced by Passali in combination with saccharin
Red colobus monkeys in Africa have been observed eating charcoal for the purposes of self-medication. Their leafy diets contain high levels of cyanide, which may lead to indigestion. So they learned to consume charcoal, which absorbs the cyanide and relieves indigestion. This knowledge about supplementing their diet is transmitted from mother to infant.[29]
Also, see Activated charcoal, medicinal applications.
Smoking
Special charcoals are used in smoking the hookah. Lit charcoals are placed on top of foil that is placed over the tobacco bowl. The charcoals "cook" the tobacco to a temperature that does not burn it but produces smoke. Normally, charcoal for hookah or shisha smoking must be hard, high density, easy to ignite, and burn longer with persistent heat.[30]
Charcoals used for smoking hookah are manufactured using multiple materials from natural charcoal, coconut coals, and less exotic woods such as oak.[31]
Environmental implications

Charcoal production at a sub-industrial level is one of the causes of deforestation. Charcoal production is now usually illegal and nearly always unregulated as in Brazil where charcoal production is actually a huge illegal industry for making pig iron.[32][33][34] Massive forest destruction has been documented in areas such as Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo, where it is considered a primary threat to the survival of the mountain gorillas.[35] Similar threats are found in Zambia.[36] In Malawi, illegal charcoal trade employs 92,800 workers and is the main source of heat and cooking fuel for 90 percent of the nation’s population.[37] Some experts, such as Duncan MacQueen, Principal Researcher–Forest Team, International Institute for Environment and Development (IIED), argue that while illegal charcoal production causes deforestation, a regulated charcoal industry that required replanting and sustainable use of the forests "would give their people clean efficient energy – and their energy industries a strong competitive advantage."

     
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·         "Powered by Elgg" inurl:/account/forgotten_password.php
·         "Latest bookmarks" "Powered by Elgg"
·         intitle:New Elgg site
·         "Example of information in the left hand pane" "Powered by Elgg"
·         "Powered by Elgg + "Latest blog posts"
·         "Powered by Elgg" inurl:account/register.php
·         inurl:/go/browse/blogs
·         inurl:register.php +"powered by elgg"
·         inurl:forgotten_password.php "We will send the address of a unique verification page to you via email click"
·         "powered by elgg"

Scuttle Footprints
Code:
·         "Store all your favourite links in one place, accessible from anywhere"
·         ?sort=alphabet_asc
·         ?sort=popularity_asc
·         Bookmarking the web 2.0
·         intext:"bookmarks" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"date" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"first" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"next" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"Previous" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"register" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:"Sort by:" "Store, share and tag your favourite links"
·         intext:about "Store, share and tag your favourite links" about
·         inurl:/populartags/
·         inurl:?sort=url_asc
·         inurl:?sort=url_asc AND "keyword"
·         inurl:bookmarks.php scuttle
·         inurl:by scuttlePLUS
·         inurl:Populartags.php/ AND "keyword"
·         inurl:scuttle/about.php
·         inurl:scuttle/bookmarks.php
·         inurl:scuttle/register
·         inurl:scuttle/register.php
·         Propulsed by SemanticScuttle
·         Store, share and tag your favourite links
·         "Speicher alle Deine Webseiten-Favoriten an einem Ort"
 Referrer Footprints
Code:
·         "usage statistics" "Summary Period: february 2009"
·         "usage statistics" "Summary Period: march 2009"
·         "Generated by Webalizer"
·         inurl:awstats.pl intitle:statistics
·         "Created by awstats"
·         inurl:usage_200811 html
·         "produced by wusage"
·         "inurl:twatch/latest" html
·         inurl:stats/REFERRER.html

Jisko Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by Jisko"
·         "Have a look at the Frequently Asked Questions" "Powered by Jisko"
·         Have a look at the Frequently Asked Questions Powered by Jisko
·         "¿Problemas al iniciar sesión?" "Powered by Jisko" "Notas públicas" "Interfaz móvil"
·         Problemas al iniciar sesión "Powered by Jisko" "Notas públicas" "Interfaz móvil"
·         site:.com “Powered by Jisko” "frequently"
·         inurl:/?module=faq "Jisko"
·         inanchor:jisko Frequently Asked Questions
Captcha Footprints
Code:
·         Please enter this code to enable your comment
·         Type the characters you see in the picture above
·         Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically
·         Allowed HTML tags
·         Lines and paragraphs break automatically
·         Word verification by reCAPTCHA
·         Can't read image
·         you may use HTML tags for style
·         play audio CAPTCHA
·         Search Engines will index and follow ONLY links to allowed domains
·         More information about formatting options
·         Disable rich-text
·         Some HTML allowed
·         In order to control spam, please type the characters you see in the box below, then click 'Confirm Post' to continue with this post
·         I agree to the Comments TOS
·         Antispam question
·         Up to 2 links allowed
·         You may use these HTML tags and attributes
·         By submitting a comment here you grant this site a perpetual license to
·         Enter the above security code (required)
·         Security Code:
·         Type the letters that you see in the above image
·         This site uses KeywordLuv
PhpFox
Code:
·         "Powered by PhpFox"
·         “phpfox” “yourkeyword” "Forum"
·         inurl:phpfox
·         "Powered By phpFox Version 2.0.4"
·         "Powered By phpFox.v2.0.6"
·         "Powered By phpFox Version 3"
·         "Powered By phpFox Version 3.2.0"

Video Sharing Sites
Code:
·         "Powered by MediaShare"
·         "Powered by clipbucket"
·         "Powered by VidiScript.com"
·         "Powered by PHPMotion"
·         "Powered by ClipShare"
·         "Powered by iVidPlay"
·         "Powered by iSoftScripts.com"
·         "Powered by VShare"
·         "Powered by Video CMS"
·         "Powered by PHP Melody"
·         "Powered by ClipBucket"
·         "Powered by SkaDate" - online dating and social networking software combined
·         "Powered by Sharemixer" - low cost video sharing solution a la Youtube
·         "Powered by Clipshare"
·         "Powered by SocialMedia.com"
Do-Follow Blogs
Code:
·         Keywords “Powered by BlogEngine.NET”
·         Keywords “top commenter”
·         Keywords “Notify me of follow-up comments”
·         Keywords “This site uses KeywordLuv”
·         Keywords “Enable CommentLuv”
·         Keywords “You can use these tags”
·         “@Keyword(s) yourniche”
·         “This site uses KeywordLuv yourniche”
·         Top commenter Keyword(s)
·         Top commenters Keyword(s)
·         Top commentators Keyword(s)
·         Top commentors Keyword(s)
·         inurl:ucomment
·         inurl:ifollow
·         Keyword(s) "Recent Comments"
General Niche Directory
Code:
·         “keyword” with your Niche keyword
·         intitle:add+url “keyword”
·         intitle:submit+your+site “keyword”
·         intitle:add+your+site "keyword"
·         "Suggest link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest a link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest site" + "your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest a site" + "your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest a URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Suggest an URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add a link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add site" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add a site" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add a URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Add an URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit a link" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit site" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit a site" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit a URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "Submit an URL" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "favorite links" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "recommended links" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "cool sites" +"your keyword(s)"
·         "cool places" +"your keyword(s)"
·         reciprocal +"your keyword(s)"
·         directory +"your keyword(s)"
·         directorys +"your keyword(s)"
·         directories +"your keyword(s)"
·         exchange +"your keyword(s)"
·         resources +"your keyword(s)"
·         links +"your keyword(s)"
·         "your location" +"add url"
·         "your location" +"suggest a site"
·         "your location" +"submit site"
·         "your location" +links
·         "your location" +"reciprocal links"
·         "your location" +directory
Blog Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:/add-blog.php
·         inurl:/add_blog.php
·         inurl:/addblog.html
·         inurl:/addyourblog.asp
·         inurl:/blog-submission.html
·         inurl:/blog_submissions.html
·         inurl:/submit-blog.html
·         inurl:/submit_blog.html

RSS Feed
Code:
·         inurl:/submitrssfeed.aspx
·         inurl:/AddFeed.aspx
·         inurl:/AddRSS.asp
·         inurl:/Ping/
·         inurl:/RSS_submission_form.asp
·         inurl:/RSSform.asp?cat
·         inurl:/Suggest-A-Feed
·         inurl:/addFeed.do
·         inurl:/add_feed.php
·         inurl:/addfeed.html
·         inurl:/addfeed.php
·         inurl:/addfeed/
·         inurl:/cgi_rss_submission
·         inurl:/feedAdd.cfm
·         inurl:/newfeed.php
·         inurl:/ping.asp
·         inurl:/ping.php
·         inurl:/rss-add.html
·         inurl:/rssform.asp
·         inurl:/sub_rss.php
·         inurl:/submit-feeds.html
·         inurl:/submitFeed.jsp
·         inurl:/submit_feed.php
·         inurl:/submitfeed
·         inurl:/submitfeed.shtml
·         inurl:/submitnews.php
·         inurl:/submitrss.php
·         inurl:/suggest/feed
·         inurl:/suggest_feeds.asp
·         inurl:rss inurl:/submit.php
·         inurl:submitFeed.aspx
·         inurlL:/AddRSSFeed.jsp
General Forum
Code:
·         Keyword(s) forum
·         “Keyword(s) forum”
·         “add comment”
·         “post comment”
·         Keyword(s) members
·         Keyword(s) join
·         Keyword(s) tag
·         Keyword(s) group
·         "your niche" forum
·         "your niche" message board
·         "your niche" bulletin board
phpBB 2
Code:
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:com
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.net
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.org
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.info
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.biz
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.eu
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.us
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.ru
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.ua
·         inurl:"phpBB2/" site:.jp

phpBB 3
Code:
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:com
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.net
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.org
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.info
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.biz
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.eu
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.us
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.ru
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.ua
·         inurl:"phpBB3/" site:.jp
Guest Post Footprints
Code:
·         “Submit a guest post” / “Submit post” / “Submit blog post”
·         “Add blog post”
·         “Submit an article”
·         “Suggest a guest post”
·         “Send a guest post”
·         "Send your post"
·         "Bloggers Wanted”
·         "Guest Post”
·         "Guest Blogging Spot”
·         "Submit a Guest Post”
·         "Become a Guest Blogger”
·         "Guest Post Guidelines”
·         "Want to Write for”
·         "Blogs that Accept Guest Blogging”
·         "Blogs Accepting Guest Posts”
·         "Contribute”
·         "Submit News”
·         "Submit Tutorial”
·         "Suggest a Post”
·         "Become an Author”
·         "Become a Contributor”
·         "Places I Guest Posted”
·         "Publish Your News”
·         "Guest post by”
·         "Guest Contributor”
·         "This is a guest article”
·         "Add Articles”
·         “Add Guest Post”
·         “Guest Bloggers Wanted”
·         “Guest Posts Roundup”
·         “Write for Us”
·         “Submit Guest Post”
·         “Submit a Guest Article”
·         “Guest Bloggers Wanted”
·         “Group Writing Project”
·         “Blogs that Accept Guest Posts”
·         “Blogs that Accept Guest Bloggers”
·         “Become a Contributor”
·         “Submit Design News”
·         “Community News”
·         “Submit Blog Post”
·         “Suggest a Guest Post”
·         “Contribute to our Site”
·         “Become a Guest Writer”
·         “My Guest Posts”
·         “Submission Guidelines”
·         “This guest post was written”
·         “This guest post is from”
·         “Now Accepting Guest Posts”
·         “The following guest post”
·         inurl:guest-post-guidelines
·         inurl:guest-posts
·         inurl:write-for-us
·         inurlprofiles/blog/new
General Directory
Code:
·         "favorite links" Keyword(s)
·         "favorite links"
·         "favorite sites" Keyword(s)
·         "favorite sites"
·         "Keyword(s) sites"
·         "Keyword(s) website"
·         "Keyword(s)"
·         "list * Keyword(s) * sites"
·         "list * Keyword(s)"
·         "list of Keyword(s) sites"
·         "list of Keyword(s)"
·         "recommended links" Keyword(s)
·         "recommended links"
·         "recommended sites" Keyword(s)
·         "recommended sites"
·         directory * Keyword(s)
·         intitle:directory "Keyword(s)"
·         inurl:directory "Keyword(s)"
·         Keyword(s)
·         Keyword(s) * directory
·         Keyword(s) catalog
·         Keyword(s) directory
·         Keyword(s) sites
·         Keyword(s) websites |Keyword(s)
·         Keyword(s) websites

General Footprints
Code:
·         “add url”
·         “add site”
·         “add website”
·         “add your site”
·         “add a url”
·         “add * url”
·         “add * site”
·         “add * website*
·         “submit url”
·         “submit site”
·         “submit website”
·         “submit your site”
·         “submit a url”
·         “submit * url”
·         “submit * site”
·         “submit * website”
·         “suggest url”
·         “suggest site”
·         “suggest website”
·         “suggest your site”
·         “suggest a url”
·         “suggest * url”
·         “suggest * site”
·         “suggest * website”

Auto Approve
Code:
·         "*Keyword says:" +"October 12th, 2012"
·         Submitted by Anonymous (not verified)
·         Submitted by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 10/12/2012
·         "October 12th, 2012" + "leave a reply" + "*%kw% says" + "Mail (will not be published) (required)" + "Website"
·         site:.edu "* %kw% says" "leave a reply"
·         site:.edu "%kw% * says" "leave a reply"
·         "powered by wordpress"
·         inurl:blog
·         inurl:node

SEO-Board Footprints
Code:
·         "powered by SEO-Board"

Phorum Footprints
Code:
·         "powered by Phorum"
·         "powered by phorum" inurl:register
·         inurl:phorum inurl:register
·         inurl:/phorum/register.php

MesDiscussions Footprints
Code:
·         “MesDiscussions”

MiniBB Footprints
Code:
·         “powered by minibb”
MyBB Footprints
Code:
·         “Powered By MyBB”

IceBB Footprints
Code:
·         “powered by icebb”

Fruit Show Footprints
Code:
·         “Powered by FruitShow”

Invision Power Board Footprints
Code:
·         “Powered by Invision Power Board”
·         “Powered by Invision Power Board(U) v1.3 Final”
·         intext:“Powered by Invision Power Board” inurl:action=register
·         intext:“Powered by Invision Power Board” inurl:register
·         intext:“Powered by Invision Power Board” inurl:/users/register
·         "Powered By IP.Board 2.3.3"
·         “Powered By IP.Board 2.3.5”
·         “Powered By IP.Board 2.3.6”

vBulletin Forum Footprints
Code:
·         "In order to proceed, you must agree with the following rules"
·         "Powered by vBulletin"
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.0”
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.1”
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.4”
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.5”
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.6”
·         “Powered by vBulletin * 3.0.7”
inurl:newreply.php
·         "Powered by vBulletin" inurl:register.php

Simple Machines Forum (SMF) Footprints
Code:
·         "powered by SMF"
·         "powered by Simple Machines"
·         inurl:/index.php?action=register
·         "powered by Simple Machines" inurl:/index.php?action=register

Web 2.0 Footprint
Code:
·         "powered by wordpress"
·         "powered by blogger"
·         "powered by tumblr"
·         "Create a free website with weebly"
·         "Powered By Elgg"
·         intitle:"powered by jcow"
·         We won't display your email address
·         Forums Signatures Footprints
·         Code:
·         inurl:.edu "Find all posts by""Find all threads started by""Total Posts: 0" "signature"
·         nurl:.gov "Find all posts by""Find all threads started by""Total Posts: 0" "signature"
·         "powered by phpbb" "Total Posts: 0" "signature"
·         "powered by vbulletin" "Find all posts by""Find all threads started by""Total Posts: 0" "signature"

CommentLuv Blog Footprints
Code:
·         Keyword(s) “Enable CommentLuv”

Top Comments Blog Footprints
Code:
·         Keyword(s) “Top Commenter”
·         Keyword(s) “Top Commenters”
·         +"top+commenters"+"powered+by+wordpress" Keyword
·         “Top Commenters” or “Top Commenter”
·         “Top Commenters” or “Top Commenter” +inurl:201.
·         “Top Commenters” or “Top Commenter” +inurl:2012

Squidoo comments Footprints
Code:
·         site:squidoo.com "add to this list"
·         site:www.squidoo.com "Squidoo : Tags" KEYWORD

HubPages comments Footprints
Code:
·         site:HubPages.com KEYWORD "Hot Hubs"

XOOPS Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:userinfo.php?uid
·         “powered by xoops”
·         "Receive occasional email notices from administrators and moderators?"

BoonEx Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by Dolphin - Free Community Software"
CBOX Footprints
Code:
·         "help · smilies · cbox"
·         allintext:[get a cbox]
·         smartgb.com Footprints
·         Code:
·         "Get your own free guestbook from smartgb.com"
Revou Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered By ReVou Software"
·         "groups" "Most popular" "All Groups" "Forgot your password?" "Powered By" "ReVou Software"
·         "groups" "Most popular" "All Groups" "Forgot your password?" "Powered By"
·         intitle:"what are you doing" "groups" "Most popular" "All Groups" "Forgot your password?" "Powered By" "revou"
·         intitle:"what are you doing" "revou"
StatusNet Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by StatusNet"
·         "1-64 lowercase letters or numbers, no punctuation or spaces. Required."
·         "is a microblogging service brought to you by Status.net. It runs the StatusNet microblogging software, version"
INDEXU Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:suggest_category.php
·         inurl:top_rated.php
·         "INDEXU 5.4.0"
Webmini Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:p/0/asc
·         inurl:a/0/asc
·         Hurricane Footprints
·         Code:
·         Powered by Katalog Stron Hurricane V
FreeGlobes Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:allcats.html
SEOKatalog Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by SEOKatalog"
Ning Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:ning.com
·         "social network platform"
·         intext:http://www.ning.com/
·         “Powered by Ning”
·         “We use Ning ID for authentication.”
·         “What is a Ning ID?”
·         inurl: /main/authorization/signIn
·         inurl: /main/authorization/signUp
Insoshi Footprints
Code:
·         "powered by insoshi"
·         Powered_by_insoshi_lightbg
·         inurl:/password_reminders/new
·         “Join Insoshi”
Link Building
Code:
·         keyword sponsors
·         keyword sponsorship
·         keyword sponsor charity
·         keyword benefactors
·         keyword donate
·         keyword donations
·         keyword donors
·         keyword "add url" / "add * url"
·         keyword "add site" / "add * site"
·         keyword "add website" / "add *website"
·         keyword "submit url" / "submit * url"
·         keyword "submit site" / "submit *site"
·         keyword "submit website" / "submit * website"
·         keyword "suggest url" / "suggest * url"
·         keyword "suggest site" / "suggest site"
·         keyword "suggest website" / "suggest * website"
·         keyword "recommended links"
·         keyword "recommended sites"
·         keyword "recommended resources "
·         keyword "favorite links"
·         keyword "favorite sites"
·         keyword bookmarks
·         keyword resources
·         "list * keyword * sites"
·         "add comment" keyword / "add * comment"
·         "post comment" keyword / "post * comment"
·         keyword "leave a comment" / "leave * comment"
·         keyword "no comments"
·         keyword "notify me of follow-up comments"
·         keyword "wiki" (site:.edu)
·         keyword forum / keyword forums
·         keyword discussion boards
·         keyword members
·         keyword join
·         keyword "advertiser testimonials"
·         keyword "related URLs" / "* related URLs"
·         keyword "related sites" / "* related sites"
·         "your location" +"add url"
·         "your location" +"submit site"
·         "your location" +"suggest a site"
·         "your location" +directory
Question and Answers Footprints 1
Code:
·         "All Shapado.com content and data are available under the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 license"
·         "Answer Questions or Ask a Question" -site:qhub.com +"KW"
·         "©2012 Answers All right reserved"+"by WP-Answers." -site:wp-answers.com +intitle:"KW"
·         +"powered by Answerbase" +"KW"
·         +"powered by OSQA" +site:*/questions/ +"KW"
·         "Powered by Question2Answer" +"asked * ago by" -site:question2answer.org +"KW"
·         site:shapado.com/questions/ +"KW"
·         Data Modelers QA is a community service provided by Datanamic.
·         "Snow Theme by Q2A Market"
·         "Theme Designed By: Pixel n Grain"
·         "To see more, click for the full list of questions or popular tags."
·         "Recent questions and answers" Question2Answer
·         "Designed by Axiologic SaaS" Question2Answer
·         "powered by ASKBOT"
·         "Search tip: add tags and a query to focus your search"
·         "Content on this site is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike 3.0 license." askbot
·         "Hi, there! Please sign in" askbot
·         "Powered by Qhub.com"
·         "Answer Questions or Ask a Question"
·         "Ask a question Provide Feedback"
·         "Badges Explained" "Asked a question"
·         "questions tags users badges unanswered" "ask a question"
·         "You are welcome to start submitting your question anonymously."
Question and Answers Footprints 2
Code:
·         "powered by OSQA"
·         "Powered by Question2Answer"
·         "Powered by Shapado"
·         "Powered by Shapado 4.1.0"
·         "Answers Theme by Premium Wordpress Themes"
·         "Powered by Qwench"
·         "Question Answer Script"
·         "Instant Q&A"
·         "Question & Answers Wordpress Plugin by WP-Answers"
·         "Question & Answers Wordpress Plugin"
·         "by WP-Answers"
·         "AnswerScript.com"
·         "Powered by Agriya.com"
·         "Anova does not evaluate or guarantee the accuracy of any Anova content"
·         "Powered By AlstraSoft AskMe Pro"
·         "ExactAsking.com"
·         "All images are property of ExactAsking.com and Exact, Inc"
·         "©2010 ExactAsking.com"
·         "Powered by Askbot version 0.7.43"
·         "Powered by Askbot"
·         "Answer Question Script | Powered by AnswerQuestionScript.com"
·         "Answer Question Script"
·         "Powered by AnswerQuestionScript.com"
·         "Powered by LampCMS"
·         "Famous Questions CMS v1.01"
·         "by FamousWhy"
·         "Famous Questions CMS v1.01 by FamousWhy"
·         "Famous Questions CMS"
·         "powered by cahoots2"
·         "concentrated technology"
·         "powered by solace"
iral Socializer Script Footprints
Code:
·         “Add and share your bookmarks with the ease of a click”
·         “I agree Terms of servises”
·         “Export & Import favorites”
·         "Discover the popular tags"
Unclassified NewsBoard Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by the Unclassified NewsBoard"
·         intext:"Powered by the Unclassified NewsBoard" inurl:req=register
LifeType Footprints
Code:
·         "Powered by LifeType" inurl:?op=Register -Sorry -disabled -??? -neuer -disabilitato -suspendus -????????
·         "Powered by LifeType"
KickApps platform Footprints
Code:
·         "You can join by using one of our existing provider accounts: "
·         “Social Media Platform by KickApps”
·         “Powered by KickApps”
·         inurl:user/displayUserRegisterPage.kickAction
·         Social Web CMS (SWCMS) Footprints
·         [code"powered by socialwebcms"
·         "powered by SWCMS"
·         [/code]
Scraping Ezine Articles Author Footprints
Code:
·         site:ezinearticles.com "author name"
Reff Pages Footprints
Code:
·         "usage statistics" "Summary Period: September 2012"
·         "usage statistics" "Summary Period: October 2012"
·         "Generated by Webalizer"
·         inurl:awstats.pl intitle:statistics
·         "Created by awstats"
·         inurl:usage_200811 html
·         "produced by wusage"
·         "inurl:twatch/latest" html
·         inurl:stats/REFERRER.html
Showthread.php Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:%KW% showthread.php
·         intitle:%KW% showthread.php
·         %KW% showthread.php
·         Ubb.threads Footprints
·         Code:
·         inurl:%KW% "powered by ubb.threads"
·         intitle:%KW% "powered by ubb.threads"
·         %KW% "powered by ubb.threads"
Lofiversion Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:%KW% lofiversion
·         intitle:%KW% lofiversion
·         %KW% lofiversion
Forumdisplay.php Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:%KW% /forumdisplay.php?
·         intitle:%KW% /forumdisplay.php?
·         %KW% /forumdisplay.php?
New thread Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:%KW% new thread
·         intitle:%KW% new thread
·         %KW% new thread
New topic Footprints
Code:
·         inurl:%KW% new topic
·         intitle:%KW% new topic
·         %KW% new topic
E-Mail Opt-in FootPrints
Code:
·         "Sign up for email subscriptions"
·         "Enter your email address to subscribe"
·         "Join Our Email List"
·         "Subscribe to our free email newsletter"
·         "Enter email address to subscribe"
·         "Subscribe for E-mail Updates"
·         "Please enter your email address below to be added to our email list"
Few more Do-Follow Blogs Footprints
Code:
·         "Please login to be Post Comments!"
·         "Blog Comments Powered by Disqus"
·         "Leave a new comment"
·         "Comment on the Post"
·         "Related content"
·         "Enter your comment:"
·         "Comments on this entry:"
·         "Sign in to comment on this entry."
·         "Comments (You may use HTML tags for style)"
·         "Login or register to post comments"
·         "Login or register to post or rate comments"
·         "Leave a Reply" Name "(required)"' 'Mail (will not be published) "(required)"' "Website"
·         "You must be registered and logged in to leave comments."
·         "Sign in to Comment On this Entry"
Other Language Do-Follow Blogs Footprints
Code:
·         "comentar"
·         "Répondre a cet article"
·         "Scrivi commento"
·         "Anade un comentario"
·         "Ajouter un commentaire"
·         "Dejar un comentario"
·         "Pridať komentár"
·         "Komentáre"
·         "Écrire un commentaire"
·         "Dodaj nową odpowiedź"
·         "kommentarer"

·         "Comentarios para este Artículo"